Does Pregnancy Cause Snoring?

Babies and pregnancy can cause a lot of things for both women and men. Some things that come to mind are joy, pride, and excitement.

However, many pregnant women find themselves snoring by their third trimester. Is pregnancy the culprit? If so, could it have a negative impact on the health of the baby as well as the woman? Keep reading to find out.

How Pregnancy Causes Snoring
It’s no secret that pregnancy makes you gain weight. Some women gain more weight than others, but all women gain weight during this time nonetheless.

You may not be overweight, especially considering the circumstances, but you are heavier than what your body is used to. This can essentially give you some of the same problems that someone who is overweight might have. Snoring is one of those problems. Let me explain.

All of that new weight has to go somewhere. No, it doesn’t all go straight to the baby although I know many women who wish it worked that way. Unfortunately, some of that weight is bound to end up in the neck area.

This can cause snoring the same way that excess fat tissue can. The extra weight puts pressure on the airway when you are in any kind of laying position whether you are sleeping or not.

This causes your airway to become smaller. When your airway is constricted you are more likely to snore. There is one more thing to consider though and that is congestion. Many pregnant women have issues with congestion, especially at night. This does not help. When you combine a constricted airway with congestion you are almost guaranteed to snore.

What This Means For You
Snoring has many potential effects, but several are of particular interest if you are pregnant. The biggest one is an increase in blood pressure. High blood pressure is not something you want to have while you are pregnant. All of the extra weight can raise your blood pressure on its own.

Another concern is blood sugar. It is known for a fact that those who snore often have some degree of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is what can make you a diabetic if left untreated.

Effects on the Baby
Obviously you have your own reasons for not wanting high blood pressure or insulin resistance. They aren’t exactly on the top of everyone’s Christmas list.

Did you know that snoring and high blood pressure can have a serious negative impact on your baby?

They can indeed. High blood pressure, a side effect of snoring, can literally double your risk for giving birth to your baby prematurely or the baby having a low birth weight.

Although both of these things are rather common these days, I’m sure you would rather not have your baby born that way if it can be avoided.

What You Can Do
Since this is a short term problem, I generally suggest finding an anti-snoring device. My favorite is a tongue retaining mouthpiece because it is both comfortable and effective.

You could also consider doing some controlled breathing exercises. You may even be doing them already to make your pregnancy easier.

Unfortunately I can’t really recommend anything beyond those two options since you have two people to consider instead of just one during pregnancy.

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